J D Lee, Solomons, Fryhle Fundamentals of Chemistry, Class 11, Set of Textbook and Practice Book: For CBSE and Entrance Examination

Author : Wiley Editorial
ISBN 13 : 9788126561063
ISBN 10 : 8126561068
Pages : 1508
Type : Paperbound
Remarks : EXCLUSIVE TO CAREER BUDDY

9788126561063

Details

This textbook based on Concise Inorganic Chemistry by J D Lee and Organic Chemistry by Solomons & Fryhle that aims to be a must-have resource for students of Class 11. The book is enriched with unique elements and features that help understand, comprehend and apply the fundamental concepts of Chemistry. It offers conceptual strength with requisite mathematical and problem-solving tools as well as interesting applications useful for project work. The structure of Chemistry syllabus prescribed by CBSE for Class 11 broadly covers the topics: Organic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry.

TextBook

1. Some Basic Concepts of Chemistry
1.1 Importance of Chemistry
1.2 Nature of Matter
1.3 Properties of Matter and Their Measurement
1.4 Uncertainty in Measurement
1.5 Laws of Chemical Combinations
1.6 Dalton’s Atomic Theory
1.7 Atomic and Molecular Masses
1.8 Mole Concept and Molar Masses
1.9 Percentage Composition
1.10 Stoichiometry and Stoichiometric

2. Structure of Atom
2.1 Subatomic Particles
2.2 Atomic Models
2.3 Developments Leading to Bohr’s Model of an Atom
2.4 Bohr’s Model for Hydrogen Atom
2.5 Towards Quantum Mechanical Model of the Atom
2.6 Quantum Mechanical Model of Atom

3. Classification of Elements and Periodicity in Properties
3.1 Why Do We Need to Classify Elements?
3.2 Genesis of Periodic Classification
3.3 Modern Periodic Law and the Present form of the Periodic Table
3.4 Nomenclature of Elements with Atomic Numbers > 100
3.5 Electronic Configurations of Elements and the Periodic Table
3.6 Electronic Configurations and Types of Elements: s-, p-, d-, f-Blocks Periodic Trends in Properties of Elements
3.7 Periodic Trends in Physical Properties
3.8 Periodic Trends in Chemical Properties
3.9 Periodic Trends and Chemical Reactivity

4. Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
4.1 Kössel–Lewis Approach to Chemical Bonding
4.2. Ionic or Electrovalent Bond
4.3 Bond Parameters
4.4 The Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) Theory
4.5 Valence Bond Theory
4.6 Hybridization
4.7 Molecular Orbital Theory
4.8 Bonding in Some Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
4.9 Hydrogen Bonding

5. States of Matter
5.1 Intermolecular Forces
5.2 Thermal Energy
5.3 Intermolecular Forces vs. Thermal Interactions
5.4 The Gaseous State
5.5 The Gas Laws
5.6 Ideal Gas Equation
5.7 Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases
5.8 Behavior of Real Gases: Deviation from Ideal Gas Behavior
5.9 Liquefaction of Gases
5.10 Liquid State

6. Thermodynamics
6.1 Thermodynamic Terms
6.2 Applications
6.3 Measurement of ΔU and ΔH: Calorimetry
6.4 Enthalpy Change, ΔrH, of a Reaction – Reaction Enthalpy
6.5 Enthalpies of Different Types of Reactions
6.6 Spontaneity
6.7 Gibbs Energy Change and Equilibrium
6.8 Third Law of Thermodynamics

7. Equilibrium
7.1 Equilibrium in Physical Processes
7.2 Equilibrium in Chemical Processes – Dynamic Equilibrium
7.3 Law of Chemical Equilibrium and Equilibrium Constant
7.4 Homogeneous Equilibria
7.5 Heterogeneous Equilibria
7.6 Applications of Equilibrium Constants
7.7 Relationship between Equilibrium Constant K, Reaction Quotient Q and Gibbs Energy G
7.8 Factors Affecting Equilibria
7.9 Ionic equilibrium in solution
7.10 Acids, Bases and Salts
7.11 Ionization of Acids and Bases
7.12 Buffer Solutions
7.13 Solubility Equilibria of Sparingly Soluble Salts

8. Redox Reactions
8.1 Classical Idea of Redox Reactions–Oxidation and Reduction Reactions
8.2 Redox Reactions in Terms of Electron Transfer Reactions
8.3 Oxidation Number
8.4 Redox Reactions and Electrode Processes

9.  Hydrogen
9.1 Position of Hydrogen in the Periodic Table
9.2 Dihydrogen, H2
9.3 Preparation of Dihydrogen
9.4 Properties of Dihydrogen
9.5 Hydrides
9.6 Water
9.7 Hydrogen Peroxide, H2O2
9.8 Heavy Water, D2O
9.9 Dihydrogen as a Fuel

10. The s-Block Elements
10.1 Group 1 Elements: Alkali Metals
10.2 General Characteristics of Alkali Metal Compounds
10.3 Anomalous Properties of Lithium
10.4 Some Important Compounds of Sodium
10.5 Biological Importance of Sodium and Potassium
10.6 Group 2 Elements: Alkaline Earth Metals
10.7 General Characteristics of Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds
10.8 Anomalous Behavior of Beryllium
10.9 Some Important Compounds of Calcium
10.10 Biological Importance of Magnesium and

11. Some p-Block Elements

Group 13 Elements: The Boron Family
11.1 Occurrence
11.2 Electronic Configuration
11.3 Atomic Radii
11.4 Electronegativity and Ionization Enthalpy
11.5 Physical Properties
11.6 Chemical Properties
11.7 Important Trends and Anomalous Properties of Boron
11.8 Some Important Compounds of Boron
11.9 Uses of Boron and Aluminium and Their Compounds

Group 14 Elements: The Carbon Family
11.10 Occurrence
11.11 Electronic Configuration
11.12 Covalent Radii
11.13 Electronegativity and Ionization Enthalpy
11.14 Physical Properties
11.15 Chemical Properties
11.16 Important Trends and Anomalous Behavior of Carbon
11.17 Allotropes of Carbon
11.18 Some Important Compounds of Carbon and Silicon

12. Organic Chemistry: Some Basic Principles and Techniques
12.1 General Introduction
12.2 Tetravalence of Carbon: Shapes of Organic Compounds
12.3 Structural Representations of Organic Compounds
12.4 Classification of Organic Compounds
12.5 Nomenclature of Organic Compounds
12.6 Isomerism in Organic Compounds
12.7 Fundamental Concepts in Organic Reaction Mechanism
12.8 Methods of Purification of Organic Compounds
12.9 Qualitative Analysis of Organic Compounds
12.10 Quantitative Analysis of Organic

13. Hydrocarbons
13.1 Classification
13.2 Alkanes
13.3 Alkenes
13.4 Alkynes
13.5 Aromatic Hydrocarbons
13.6 Carcinogenicity and Toxicity

14. Environmental Chemistry
14.1 Environmental Pollution
14.2 Atmospheric Pollution
14.3 Tropospheric Pollution
14.4 Stratospheric Pollution
14.5 Water Pollution
14.6 Soil Pollution
14.7 Industrial Waste
14.8 Strategies to Control Environmental Pollution
14.9 Green Chemistry


Appendices
Appendix A: Physical Constants
Appendix B: Important Formulas and Units
Appendix C: Important Tabulated Concepts
Appendix D: Properties of the Elements
Appendix E: Bond Enthalpies
Appendix F: Ionization Enthalpies of the  Elements
Appendix G: Comparison of Electronegativity
Values (Pauling Units) from Four Sources



Practise Book

1. Some Basic Concepts of Chemistry
1.1 Importance of Chemistry,
1.2 Nature of Matter and
1.3 Properties of Matter and Their Measurement
1.4 Uncertainty in Measurement
1.5 Laws of Chemical Combinations and
1.6 Dalton’s Atomic Theory
1.7 Atomic and Molecular Masses
1.8 Mole Concept and Molar Masses
1.9 Percentage Composition
1.10 Stoichiometry and Stoichiometric

2. Structure of Atom
2.1 Subatomic Particles
2.2 Atomic Models
2.3 Developments Leading to Bohr’s Model of Atom
2.4 Bohr’s Model for Hydrogen Atom
2.5 Towards Quantum Mechanical Model of the Atom
2.6 Quantum Mechanical Model of Atom

3. Classification of Elements and Periodicity in Properties
3.2 Genesis of Periodic Classification
3.3 Modern Periodic Law and the Present Form of the Periodic Table
3.4 Nomenclature of Elements with Atomic Numbers > 100
3.5 Electronic Configurations of Elements and the Periodic Table and
3.6 Electronic Configurations and Types of Elements: s-, p-, d-, f-Blocks

4. Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
4.1 Kössel–Lewis Approach to Chemical Bonding
4.2 Ionic or Electrovalent Bond
4.3 Bond Parameters
4.4 The Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) Theory
4.5 Valence Bond Theory
4.6 Hybridization
4.7 Molecular Orbital Theory
4.8 Bonding in Some Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
4.9 Hydrogen Bonding

5. States of Matter
5.1 Intermolecular Forces,
5.2 Thermal Energy and
5.3 Intermolecular Forces Vs. Thermal Interactions
5.4 The Gaseous State and
5.5 The Gas Laws
5.6 Ideal Gas Equation
5.7 Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases
5.8 Behavior of Real Gases: Deviation from Ideal Gas Behavior
5.9 Liquefaction of Gases
5.10 Liquid State

6. Thermodynamics
6.1 Thermodynamic Terms
6.2 Applications
6.3 Measurement of ΔU and ΔH: Calorimetry
6.4 Enthalpy Change, ΔrH, of a Reaction – Reaction Enthalpy
6.5 Enthalpies of Different Types of Reactions
6.6 Spontaneity and 6.8 Third Law of Thermodynamics
6.7 Gibbs Energy Change and Equilibrium

7. Equilibrium
7.1 Equilibrium in Physical Processes
7.2 Equilibrium in Chemical Processes – Dynamic Equilibrium
7.3 Law of Chemical Equilibrium and Equilibrium Constant
7.4 Homogeneous Equilibria
7.5 Heterogeneous Equilibria
7.6 Applications of Equilibrium Constants and
7.7 Relationship Between Equilibrium Constant K, Reaction Quotient Q and Gibbs Energy G
7.8 Factors Affecting Equilibria
7.9 Ionic Equilibrium in Solution
7.10 Acids, Bases and Salts
7.11 Ionization of Acids and Bases
7.12 Buffer Solutions
7.13 Solubility Equilibria of Sparingly Soluble Salts

8. Redox Reactions
8.1 Classical Idea of Redox Reactions – Oxidation and Reduction Reactions and
8.2 Redox Reactions in Terms of Electron Transfer Reactions
8.3 Oxidation Number
8.4 Redox Reactions and Electrode Processes

9. Hydrogen
9.1 Position of Hydrogen in the Periodic Table
9.2 Dihydrogen, H2
9.3 Preparation of Dihydrogen
9.4 Properties of Dihydrogen
9.5 Hydrides
9.6 Water
9.7 Hydrogen Peroxide, H2O2
9.8 Heavy Water, D2O
9.9 Dihydrogen as a Fuel

10. The s-Block Elements
10.1 Group 1 Elements: Alkali Metals
10.2 General Characteristics of Alkali Metal Compounds
10.3 Anomalous Properties of Lithium and
10.8 Anomalous Behavior of Beryllium
10.4 Some Important Compounds of Sodium
10.5 Biological Importance of Sodium and Potassium and
10.10 Biological Importance of Magnesium and Calcium
10.6 Group 2 Elements: Alkaline Earth Metals
10.7 General Characteristics of Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds
10.9 Some Important Compounds of Calcium

11. Some p-Block Elements
11.1 Occurrence,
11.2 Electronic Configuration and
11.3 Atomic Radii of Group 13 Elements  
11.4 Electronegativity and Ionization Enthalpy,
11.5 Physical Properties and
11.6 Chemical Properties of Group 13 Elements  
11.7 Important Trends and Anomalous Properties of Boron and
11.8 Some Important Compounds of Boron  
11.9 Uses of Boron and Aluminium and their Compounds  
11.10 Occurrence,
11.11 Electronic Configuration and
11.12 Covalent Radius of Group 14 Elements  
11.13 Ionization Enthalpy and Electronegativity,
11.14 Physical Properties and
11.15 Chemical Properties of Group 14 Elements
11.16 Important Trends and Anomalous Behavior of Carbon and
11.17 Allotropes of Carbon  
11.18 Some Important Compounds of Carbon and Silicon
 
12. Organic Chemistry: Some Basic Principles and Techniques
12.2 Tetravalence of Carbon: Shapes of Organic Compounds  
12.3 Structural Representations of Organic Compounds  
12.4 Classification of Organic Compounds and
12.5 Nomenclature of Organic Compounds  
12.6 Isomerism in Organic Compounds
12.7 Fundamental Concepts in Organic Reaction Mechanism  
12.8 Methods of Purification of Organic Compounds
12.9 Qualitative Analysis of Organic Compounds
12.10 Quantitative Analysis of Organic Compounds  

13. Hydrocarbons
13.1 Classification
13.2 Alkanes
13.3 Alkenes
13.4 Alkynes
13.5 Aromatic Hydrocarbon
13.6 Carcinogenicity and Toxicity

14. Environmental Chemistry
14.1 Environmental Pollution
14.2 Atmospheric Pollution,
14.3 Tropospheric Pollution and
14.4 Stratospheric Pollution
14.5 Water Pollution
14.6 Soil Pollution
14.7 Industrial Waste and
14.8 Strategies to Control Environmental Pollution
14.9 Green Chemistry

Practice Problems
Very Short Answer Questions
Short Answer Questions
Long Answer Questions
Challenge Problems—HOTS
Answer Key
Target Competition
Competitive Edge
Worked Problems
Practice Problems
Single Correct Choice Type
Multiple Correct Choice Type
Assertion–Reasoning Type
Integer Answer Type
Matrix–Match Type
Answer Key

Appendices
Appendix A: Physical Constants
Appendix B: Important Formulas and Units
Appendix C: Important Tabulated Concepts
Appendix D: Properties of the Elements
Appendix E: Bond Enthalpies
Appendix F: Ionization Enthalpies of the Elements
Appendix G: Comparison of Electronegativity
Values (Pauling Units) from Four Sources

 Primary market:
·Students preparing for Class 11 and competitive entrance examinations  in Engineering and Medical.
·Instructors teaching the CBSE Class 11 course in schools / junior colleges.

Secondary market:
·For chemistry students preparing for Class 11 examinations of other state boards.
·For students preparing for other regional engineering entrance examinations.
·For coaching class instructors in preparing students for competitive engineering and medical examinations.

John Lee was a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry at Loughborough University, Leicestershire, UK and has authored many books and journal articles.


T. W. Graham Solomons in Duke University where he worked with C. K. Bradsher. Following this he was a Sloan Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Rochester where he worked with V. Boekelheide. For several years he was director of an NSF-sponsored Undergraduate Research Participation Program at USF. His research interests have been in the areas of heterocyclic chemistry and unusual aromatic compounds.

Craig Barton Fryhle is Chair and Professor of Chemistry at Pacific Lutheran University. His research interests have been in areas relating to the shikimic acid pathway, including molecular modeling and NMR spectrometry of substrates and analogues, as well as structure and reactivity studies of shikimate pathway enzymes using isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry.