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Operating System Concepts, 9ed, ISV

Abraham Silberschatz

ISBN: 9788126554270

Exclusively distributed by CBS Publishers & Distributors

 

INR 669

Description

The ninth edition of Operating System Concepts continues to evolve to provide a solid theoretical foundation for understanding operating systems. This edition has been updated with more extensive coverage of the most current topics and applications, improved conceptual coverage and additional content to bridge the gap between concepts and actual implementations. A new design allows for easier navigation and enhances reader motivation. Additional end-of-chapter, exercises, review questions and programming exercises help to further reinforce important concepts. WileyPLUS, including a test bank, self-check exercises and a student solutions manual, is also part of the comprehensive support package.

 

Part One Overview

 

Chapter 1 Introduction

1.1 What Operating Systems Do

1.2 Computer-System Organization

1.3 Computer-System Architecture

1.4 Operating-System Structure

1.5 Operating-System Operations

1.6 Process Management

1.7 Memory Management

1.8 Storage Management

1.9 Protection and Security

1.10 Kernel Data Structures

1.11 Computing Environments

1.12 Open-Source Operating Systems

1.13 Summary

 

Chapter 2 System Structures

2.1 Operating-System Services

2.2 User and Operating-System Interface

2.3 System Calls

2.4 Types of System Calls

2.5 System Programs

2.6 Operating-System Design and Implementation

2.7 Operating-System Structure

2.8 Operating-System Debugging

2.9 Operating-System Generation

2.10 System Boot

2.11 Summary

 

Part Two Process Management

 

Chapter 3 Process Concept

3.1 Process Concept

3.2 Process Scheduling

3.3 Operations on Processes

3.4 Interprocess Communication

3.5 Examples of IPC Systems

3.6 Communication in Client--Server Systems

3.7 Summary

 

Chapter 4 Multithreaded Programming

4.1 Overview

4.2 Multicore Programming

4.3 Multithreading Models

4.4 Thread Libraries

4.5 Implicit Threading

4.6 Threading Issues

4.7 Operating-System Examples

4.8 Summary

 

Chapter 5 Process Scheduling

5.1 Basic Concepts

5.2 Scheduling Criteria

5.3 Scheduling Algorithms

5.4 Thread Scheduling

5.5 Multiple-Processor Scheduling

5.6 Real-Time CPU Scheduling

5.7 Operating-System Examples

5.8 Algorithm Evaluation

5.9 Summary

 

Chapter 6 Synchronization

6.1 Background

6.2 The Critical-Section Problem

6.3 Peterson's Solution

6.4 Synchronization Hardware

6.5 Mutex Locks

6.6 Semaphores

6.7 Classic Problems of Synchronization

6.8 Monitors

6.9 Synchronization Examples

6.10 Alternative Approaches

6.11 Summary

 

Chapter 7 Deadlocks

7.1 System Model

7.2 Deadlock Characterization

7.3 Methods for Handling Deadlocks

7.4 Deadlock Prevention

7.5 Deadlock Avoidance

7.6 Deadlock Detection

7.7 Recovery from Deadlock

7.8 Summary

 

Part Three Memory Management

 

Chapter 8 Memory-Management Strategies

8.1 Background

8.2 Swapping

8.3 Contiguous Memory Allocation

8.4 Segmentation

8.5 Paging

8.6 Structure of the Page Table

8.7 Example: Intel 32 and 64-bit Architectures

8.8 Example: ARM Architecture

8.9 Summary

 

Chapter 9 Virtual-Memory Management

9.1 Background

9.2 Demand Paging

9.3 Copy-on-Write

9.4 Page Replacement

9.5 Allocation of Frames

9.6 Thrashing

9.7 Memory-Mapped Files

9.8 Allocating Kernel Memory

9.9 Other Considerations

9.10 Operating-System Examples

9.11 Summary

 

Part Four Storage Management

 

Chapter 10 File System

10.1 File Concept

10.2 Access Methods

10.3 Directory and Disk Structure

10.4 File-System Mounting

10.5 File Sharing

10.6 Protection

10.7 Summary

 

Chapter 11 Implementing File-Systems

11.1 File-System Structure

11.2 File-System Implementation

11.3 Directory Implementation

11.4 Allocation Methods

11.5 Free-Space Management

11.6 Efficiency and Performance

11.7 Recovery

11.8 NFS 523

11.9 Example: The WAFL File System

11.10 Summary

 

Chapter 12 Mass-Storage Structure

12.1 Overview of Mass-Storage Structure

12.2 Disk Structure

12.3 Disk Attachment

12.4 Disk Scheduling

12.5 Disk Management

12.6 Swap-Space Management

12.7 RAID Structure

12.8 Stable-Storage Implementation

12.9 Summary

 

Chapter 13 I/O Systems

13.1 Overview

13.2 I/O Hardware

13.3 Application I/O Interface

13.4 Kernel I/O Subsystem

13.5 Transforming I/O Requests to Hardware Operations

13.6 STREAMS

13.7 Performance

13.8 Summary

 

Part Five Protection and Security

 

Chapter 14 System Protection

14.1 Goals of Protection

14.2 Principles of Protection

14.3 Domain of Protection

14.4 Access Matrix

14.5 Implementation of the Access Matrix

14.6 Access Control

14.7 Revocation of Access Rights

14.8 Capability-Based Systems

14.9 Language-Based Protection

14.10 Summary

 

Chapter 15 System Security

15.1 The Security Problem

15.2 Program Threats

15.3 System and Network Threats

15.4 Cryptography as a Security Tool

15.5 User Authentication

15.6 Implementing Security Defenses

15.7 Firewalling to Protect Systems and Networks

15.8 Computer-Security Classifications

15.9 An Example: Windows 7

15.10 Summary

 

Part Six Case Studies

 

Chapter 16 The Linux System

16.1 Linux History

16.2 Design Principles

16.3 Kernel Modules

16.4 Process Management

16.5 Scheduling

16.6 Memory Management

16.7 File Systems

16.8 Input and Output

16.9 Interprocess Communication

16.10 Network Structure

16.11 Security

16.12 Summary

 

Chapter 17 Windows 7

17.1 History

17.2 Design Principles

17.3 System Components

17.4 Terminal Services and Fast User Switching

17.5 File System

17.6 Networking

17.7 Programmer Interface

17.8 Summary

 

Chapter 18 Influential Operating Systems

18.1 Feature Migration

18.2 Early Systems

18.3 Atlas

18.4 XDS-940

18.5 THE

18.6 RC 4000

18.7 CTSS

18.8 MULTICS

18.9 IBM OS/360

18.10 TOPS-20

18.11 CP/M and MS/DOS

18.12 Macintosh Operating System and Windows

18.13 Mach

18.14 Other Systems

 

Exercises

Bibliographical Notes

 

Appendices (Online)

Appendix A BSD UNIX

A.1 UNIX History

A.2 Design Principles

A.3 Programmer Interface

A.4 User Interface

A.5 Process Management

A.6 Memory Management

A.7 File System

A.8 I/O System

A.9 Interprocess Communication

A.10 Summary

 

Appendix B The Mach System

B.1 History of the Mach System

B.2 Design Principles

B.3 System Components

B.4 Process Management

B.5 Interprocess Communication

B.6 Memory Management

B.7 Programmer Interface

B.8 Summary

 

Exercises

Bibliographical Notes